svn commit: r40681 - head/en_US.ISO8859-1/books/handbook/filesystems

Warren Block wblock at FreeBSD.org
Fri Jan 18 23:26:14 UTC 2013


Author: wblock
Date: Fri Jan 18 23:26:13 2013
New Revision: 40681
URL: http://svnweb.freebsd.org/changeset/doc/40681

Log:
  Whitespace-only fixes for the filesystems chapter.  Translators, please
  ignore.
  
  Patch from dru on freebsd-doc, plus additional indentation fixes for ZFS
  section and a few other miscellaneous whitespace problems.
  
  Submitted by:	Dru Lavigne <dru.lavigne at att.net>

Modified:
  head/en_US.ISO8859-1/books/handbook/filesystems/chapter.xml

Modified: head/en_US.ISO8859-1/books/handbook/filesystems/chapter.xml
==============================================================================
--- head/en_US.ISO8859-1/books/handbook/filesystems/chapter.xml	Fri Jan 18 22:30:06 2013	(r40680)
+++ head/en_US.ISO8859-1/books/handbook/filesystems/chapter.xml	Fri Jan 18 23:26:13 2013	(r40681)
@@ -47,17 +47,18 @@
       (<acronym>ZFS</acronym>).</para>
 
     <para>There are different levels of support for the various file
-      systems in &os;.  Some will require a kernel module to be loaded,
-      others may require a toolset to be installed.  This chapter is
-      designed to help users of &os; access other file systems on their
-      systems, starting with the &sun; Z file
+      systems in &os;.  Some will require a kernel module to be
+      loaded, others may require a toolset to be installed.  This
+      chapter is designed to help users of &os; access other file
+      systems on their systems, starting with the &sun; Z file
       system.</para>
 
     <para>After reading this chapter, you will know:</para>
 
     <itemizedlist>
       <listitem>
-	<para>The difference between native and supported file systems.</para>
+	<para>The difference between native and supported file
+	  systems.</para>
       </listitem>
 
       <listitem>
@@ -113,10 +114,11 @@
       <title>ZFS Tuning</title>
 
       <para>The <acronym>ZFS</acronym> subsystem utilizes much of
-	the system resources, so some tuning may be required to provide
-	maximum efficiency during every-day use.  As an experimental
-	feature in &os; this may change in the near future; however,
-	at this	time, the following steps are recommended.</para>
+	the system resources, so some tuning may be required to
+	provide maximum efficiency during every-day use.  As an
+	experimental feature in &os; this may change in the near
+	future; however, at this time, the following steps are
+	recommended.</para>
 
       <sect3>
 	<title>Memory</title>
@@ -127,9 +129,10 @@
 	  several other tuning mechanisms in place.</para>
 
 	<para>Some people have had luck using fewer than one gigabyte
-	  of memory, but with such a limited amount of physical memory,
-	  when the system is under heavy load, it is very plausible
-	  that &os; will panic due to memory exhaustion.</para>
+	  of memory, but with such a limited amount of physical
+	  memory, when the system is under heavy load, it is very
+	  plausible that &os; will panic due to memory
+	  exhaustion.</para>
       </sect3>
 
       <sect3>
@@ -138,11 +141,12 @@
 	<para>It is recommended that unused drivers and options
 	  be removed from the kernel configuration file.  Since most
 	  devices are available as modules, they may be loaded
-	  using the <filename>/boot/loader.conf</filename> file.</para>
+	  using the <filename>/boot/loader.conf</filename>
+	  file.</para>
 
-	<para>Users of the &i386; architecture should add the following
-	  option to their kernel configuration file, rebuild their
-	  kernel, and reboot:</para>
+	<para>Users of the &i386; architecture should add the
+	  following option to their kernel configuration file,
+	  rebuild their kernel, and reboot:</para>
 
 	<programlisting>options 	KVA_PAGES=512</programlisting>
 
@@ -158,11 +162,11 @@
       <sect3>
 	<title>Loader Tunables</title>
 
-	<para>The <devicename>kmem</devicename> address space should be
-	  increased on all &os; architectures.  On the test system with
-	  one gigabyte of physical memory, success was achieved with the
-	  following options which should be placed in
-	  the <filename>/boot/loader.conf</filename> file and the system
+	<para>The <devicename>kmem</devicename> address space should
+	  be increased on all &os; architectures.  On the test system
+	  with one gigabyte of physical memory, success was achieved
+	  with the following options which should be placed in the
+	  <filename>/boot/loader.conf</filename> file and the system
 	  restarted:</para>
 
 	<programlisting>vm.kmem_size="330M"
@@ -170,9 +174,9 @@ vm.kmem_size_max="330M"
 vfs.zfs.arc_max="40M"
 vfs.zfs.vdev.cache.size="5M"</programlisting>
 
-	<para>For a more detailed list of recommendations for ZFS-related
-	  tuning, see
-	  <ulink url="http://wiki.freebsd.org/ZFSTuningGuide"></ulink>.</para>
+	<para>For a more detailed list of recommendations for
+	  ZFS-related tuning, see <ulink
+	    url="http://wiki.freebsd.org/ZFSTuningGuide"></ulink>.</para>
       </sect3>
     </sect2>
 
@@ -184,23 +188,25 @@ vfs.zfs.vdev.cache.size="5M"</programlis
 	initialization.  To set it, issue the following
 	commands:</para>
 
-	<screen>&prompt.root; <userinput>echo 'zfs_enable="YES"' >> /etc/rc.conf</userinput>
+      <screen>&prompt.root; <userinput>echo 'zfs_enable="YES"' >> /etc/rc.conf</userinput>
 &prompt.root; <userinput>/etc/rc.d/zfs start</userinput></screen>
 
-	<para>The remainder of this document assumes three
-	  <acronym>SCSI</acronym> disks are available, and their device names
-	  are <devicename><replaceable>da0</replaceable></devicename>,
-	  <devicename><replaceable>da1</replaceable></devicename>
-	  and <devicename><replaceable>da2</replaceable></devicename>.
-	  Users of <acronym>IDE</acronym> hardware may use the
-	  <devicename><replaceable>ad</replaceable></devicename>
-	  devices in place of <acronym>SCSI</acronym> hardware.</para>
+      <para>The remainder of this document assumes three
+	<acronym>SCSI</acronym> disks are available, and their
+	device names are
+	<devicename><replaceable>da0</replaceable></devicename>,
+	<devicename><replaceable>da1</replaceable></devicename>
+	and <devicename><replaceable>da2</replaceable></devicename>.
+	Users of <acronym>IDE</acronym> hardware may use the
+	<devicename><replaceable>ad</replaceable></devicename>
+	devices in place of <acronym>SCSI</acronym> hardware.</para>
 
       <sect3>
 	<title>Single Disk Pool</title>
 
-	<para>To create a simple, non-redundant <acronym>ZFS</acronym> pool using a
-	  single disk device, use the <command>zpool</command> command:</para>
+	<para>To create a simple, non-redundant <acronym>ZFS</acronym>
+	  pool using a single disk device, use the
+	  <command>zpool</command> command:</para>
 
 	<screen>&prompt.root; <userinput>zpool create example /dev/da0</userinput></screen>
 
@@ -239,8 +245,8 @@ drwxr-xr-x  21 root  wheel  512 Aug 29 2
 
 	<para>The <literal>example/compressed</literal> is now a
 	  <acronym>ZFS</acronym> compressed file system.  Try copying
-	  some large files to it by copying them to
-	  <filename class="directory">/example/compressed</filename>.</para>
+	  some large files to it by copying them to <filename
+	    class="directory">/example/compressed</filename>.</para>
 
 	<para>The compression may now be disabled with:</para>
 
@@ -307,8 +313,8 @@ example/data        17547008       0 175
 	  amount of available space.  This is the reason for using
 	  <command>df</command> through these examples, to show
 	  that the file systems are using only the amount of space
-	  they need and will all draw from the same pool.
-	  The <acronym>ZFS</acronym> file system does away with concepts
+	  they need and will all draw from the same pool.  The
+	  <acronym>ZFS</acronym> file system does away with concepts
 	  such as volumes and partitions, and allows for several file
 	  systems to occupy the same pool.  Destroy the file systems,
 	  and then destroy the pool as they are no longer
@@ -332,28 +338,31 @@ example/data        17547008       0 175
 	<para>As previously noted, this section will assume that
 	  three <acronym>SCSI</acronym> disks exist as devices
 	  <devicename>da0</devicename>, <devicename>da1</devicename>
-	  and <devicename>da2</devicename> (or <devicename>ad0</devicename>
-	  and beyond in case IDE disks are being used).  To create a
-	  <acronym>RAID</acronym>-Z pool, issue the following
-	  command:</para>
+	  and <devicename>da2</devicename> (or
+	  <devicename>ad0</devicename> and beyond in case IDE disks
+	  are being used).  To create a <acronym>RAID</acronym>-Z
+	  pool, issue the following command:</para>
 
 	<screen>&prompt.root; <userinput>zpool create storage raidz da0 da1 da2</userinput></screen>
 
-	<note><para>&sun; recommends that the amount of devices used in a
-	  <acronym>RAID</acronym>-Z configuration is between three and nine.  If your needs
-	  call for a single pool to consist of 10 disks or more, consider
-	  breaking it up into smaller <acronym>RAID</acronym>-Z groups.  If
-	  you only have two disks and still require redundancy, consider using
-	  a <acronym>ZFS</acronym> mirror instead.  See the &man.zpool.8;
-	  manual page for more details.</para></note>
+	<note>
+	  <para>&sun; recommends that the amount of devices used
+	    in a <acronym>RAID</acronym>-Z configuration is between
+	    three and nine.  If your needs call for a single pool to
+	    consist of 10 disks or more, consider breaking it up into
+	    smaller <acronym>RAID</acronym>-Z groups.  If you only
+	    have two disks and still require redundancy, consider
+	    using a <acronym>ZFS</acronym> mirror instead.  See the
+	    &man.zpool.8; manual page for more details.</para>
+	</note>
 
 	<para>The <literal>storage</literal> zpool should have been
-	  created.  This may be verified by using the &man.mount.8; and
-	  &man.df.1; commands as before.  More disk devices may have
-	  been allocated by adding them to the end of the list above.
-	  Make a new file system in the pool, called
-	  <literal>home</literal>, where user files will eventually be
-	  placed:</para>
+	  created.  This may be verified by using the &man.mount.8;
+	  and &man.df.1; commands as before.  More disk devices may
+	  have been allocated by adding them to the end of the list
+	  above.  Make a new file system in the pool, called
+	  <literal>home</literal>, where user files will eventually
+	  be placed:</para>
 
 	<screen>&prompt.root; <userinput>zfs create storage/home</userinput></screen>
 
@@ -529,13 +538,14 @@ errors: No known data errors</screen>
 	<screen>&prompt.root; <userinput>zfs set checksum=off storage/home</userinput></screen>
 
 	<para>This is not a wise idea, however, as checksums take
-	  very little storage space and are more useful when enabled.  There
-	  also appears to be no noticeable costs in having them enabled.
-	  While enabled, it is possible to have <acronym>ZFS</acronym>
-	  check data integrity using checksum verification.  This
-	  process is known as <quote>scrubbing.</quote>  To verify the
-	  data integrity of the <literal>storage</literal> pool, issue
-	  the following command:</para>
+	  very little storage space and are more useful when enabled.
+	  There also appears to be no noticeable costs in having them
+	  enabled.  While enabled, it is possible to have
+	  <acronym>ZFS</acronym> check data integrity using checksum
+	  verification.  This process is known as
+	  <quote>scrubbing.</quote>  To verify the data integrity of
+	  the <literal>storage</literal> pool, issue the following
+	  command:</para>
 
 	<screen>&prompt.root; <userinput>zpool scrub storage</userinput></screen>
 
@@ -571,178 +581,187 @@ errors: No known data errors</screen>
       </sect3>
 
       <sect3>
-		<title>ZFS Quotas</title>
+	<title>ZFS Quotas</title>
 
-		<para>ZFS supports different types of quotas; the refquota, the
-		  general quota, the user quota, and the group quota.  This
-		  section will explain the basics of each one, and include some
-		  usage instructions.</para>
-
-		<para>Quotas limit the amount of space that a dataset and its
-		  descendants can consume, and enforce a limit on the amount of
-		  space used by filesystems and snapshots for the descendants.
-		  In terms of users, quotas are useful to limit the amount of
-		  space a particular user can use.</para>
-
-		<note>
-	  	  <para>Quotas cannot be set on volumes, as the
-	  	    <literal>volsize</literal> property acts as an implicit
-	  	    quota.</para>
-		</note>
-
-		<para>The refquota,
-		  <literal>refquota=<replaceable>size</replaceable></literal>,
-		  limits the amount of space a dataset can consume by enforcing
-		  a hard limit on the space used.  However, this hard limit does
-		  not include space used by descendants, such as file systems or
-		  snapshots.</para>
-
-		<para>To enforce a general quota of 10 GB for
-		  <filename>storage/home/bob</filename>, use the
-		  following:</para>
-
-		<screen>&prompt.root; <userinput>zfs set quota=10G storage/home/bob</userinput></screen>
-
-		<para>User quotas limit the amount of space that can be used by
-		  the specified user.  The general format is
-		  <literal>userquota@<replaceable>user</replaceable>=<replaceable>size</replaceable></literal>,
-		  and the user's name must be in one of the following
-		  formats:</para>
-
-		<itemizedlist>
-	  	  <listitem>
-	    	<para><acronym
-	    	  role="Portable Operating System Interface">POSIX</acronym>
-	    	  compatible name (e.g., <replaceable>joe</replaceable>).</para>
-	  	  </listitem>
-	  	  <listitem>
-	    	<para><acronym
-	    	  role="Portable Operating System Interface">POSIX</acronym>
-	    	  numeric ID (e.g., <replaceable>789</replaceable>).</para>
-	  	  </listitem>
-	  	  <listitem>
-	    	<para><acronym
-	    	  role="System Identifier">SID</acronym>
-	    	  name (e.g.,
-	    	  <replaceable>joe.bloggs at example.com</replaceable>).</para>
-	  	  </listitem>
-	  	  <listitem>
-	    	<para><acronym role="System Identifier">SID</acronym>
-	    	  numeric ID (e.g.,
-	    	  <replaceable>S-1-123-456-789</replaceable>).</para>
-	  	  </listitem>
-		</itemizedlist>
-
-		<para>For example, to enforce a quota of 50 GB for a user
-		  named <replaceable>joe</replaceable>, use the
-		  following:</para>
-
-		<screen>&prompt.root; <userinput>zfs set userquota at joe=50G</userinput></screen>
-
-		<para>To remove the quota or make sure that one is not
-		  set, instead use:</para>
-
-		<screen>&prompt.root; <userinput>zfs set userquota at joe=none</userinput></screen>
-
-		<para>User quota properties are not displayed by
-		  <command>zfs get all</command>. Non-<username>root</username>
-		  users can only see their own quotas unless they have been
-		  granted the <literal>userquota</literal> privilege.  Users
-		  with this privilege are able to view and set everyone's
-		  quota.</para>
-
-		<para>The group quota limits the amount of space that a
-		  specified user group can consume.  The general format is
-		  <literal>groupquota@<replaceable>group</replaceable>=<replaceable>size</replaceable></literal>.</para>
-
-		<para>To set the quota for the group
-		  <replaceable>firstgroup</replaceable> to 50 GB,
-		  use:</para>
-
-		<screen>&prompt.root; <userinput>zfs set groupquota at firstgroup=50G</userinput></screen>
-
-		<para>To remove the quota for the group
-		  <replaceable>firstgroup</replaceable>, or make sure that one
-		  is not set, instead use:</para>
-
-		<screen>&prompt.root; <userinput>zfs set groupquota at firstgroup=none</userinput></screen>
-
-		<para>As with the user quota property,
-		  non-<username>root</username> users can only see the quotas
-		  associated with the user groups that they belong to, however
-		  a <username>root</username> user or a user with the
-		  <literal>groupquota</literal> privilege can view and set all
-		  quotas for all groups.</para>
-
-		<para>The <command>zfs userspace</command> subcommand displays
-		  the amount of space consumed by each user on the specified
-		  filesystem or snapshot, along with any specified quotas.
-		  The <command>zfs groupspace</command> subcommand does the
-		  same for groups.  For more information about supported
-		  options, or only displaying specific options, see
-		  &man.zfs.1;.</para>
-
-		<para>To list the quota for
-		  <filename>storage/home/bob</filename>, if you have the
-		  correct privileges or are <username>root</username>,
-		  use the following:</para>
+	<para>ZFS supports different types of quotas; the
+	  refquota, the general quota, the user quota, and
+	  the group quota.  This section will explain the
+	  basics of each one, and include some usage
+	  instructions.</para>
+
+	<para>Quotas limit the amount of space that a dataset
+	  and its descendants can consume, and enforce a limit
+	  on the amount of space used by filesystems and
+	  snapshots for the descendants.  In terms of users,
+	  quotas are useful to limit the amount of space a
+	  particular user can use.</para>
+
+	<note>
+	  <para>Quotas cannot be set on volumes, as the
+	    <literal>volsize</literal> property acts as an
+	    implicit quota.</para>
+	</note>
+
+	<para>The refquota,
+	  <literal>refquota=<replaceable>size</replaceable></literal>,
+	  limits the amount of space a dataset can consume
+	  by enforcing a hard limit on the space used.  However,
+	  this hard limit does not include space used by descendants,
+	  such as file systems or snapshots.</para>
+
+	<para>To enforce a general quota of 10 GB for
+	  <filename>storage/home/bob</filename>, use the
+	  following:</para>
+
+	<screen>&prompt.root; <userinput>zfs set quota=10G storage/home/bob</userinput></screen>
+
+	<para>User quotas limit the amount of space that can
+	  be used by the specified user.  The general format
+	  is
+	  <literal>userquota@<replaceable>user</replaceable>=<replaceable>size</replaceable></literal>,
+	  and the user's name must be in one of the following
+	  formats:</para>
+
+	<itemizedlist>
+	  <listitem>
+	    <para><acronym
+		role="Portable Operating System
+	      Interface">POSIX</acronym> compatible name
+	      (e.g., <replaceable>joe</replaceable>).</para>
+	  </listitem>
+
+	  <listitem>
+	    <para><acronym
+		role="Portable Operating System
+		Interface">POSIX</acronym>
+	      numeric ID (e.g.,
+	      <replaceable>789</replaceable>).</para>
+	  </listitem>
+
+	  <listitem>
+	    <para><acronym role="System Identifier">SID</acronym> name
+	      (e.g.,
+	      <replaceable>joe.bloggs at example.com</replaceable>).</para>
+	  </listitem>
+
+	  <listitem>
+	    <para><acronym role="System Identifier">SID</acronym>
+	      numeric ID (e.g.,
+	      <replaceable>S-1-123-456-789</replaceable>).</para>
+	  </listitem>
+	</itemizedlist>
+
+	<para>For example, to enforce a quota of 50 GB for a user
+	  named <replaceable>joe</replaceable>, use the
+	  following:</para>
+
+	<screen>&prompt.root; <userinput>zfs set userquota at joe=50G</userinput></screen>
+
+	<para>To remove the quota or make sure that one is not set,
+	  instead use:</para>
+
+	<screen>&prompt.root; <userinput>zfs set userquota at joe=none</userinput></screen>
+
+	<para>User quota properties are not displayed by
+	  <command>zfs get all</command>.
+	  Non-<username>root</username> users can only see their own
+	  quotas unless they have been granted the
+	  <literal>userquota</literal> privilege.  Users with this
+	  privilege are able to view and set everyone's quota.</para>
+
+	<para>The group quota limits the amount of space that a
+	  specified user group can consume.  The general format is
+	  <literal>groupquota@<replaceable>group</replaceable>=<replaceable>size</replaceable></literal>.</para>
+
+	<para>To set the quota for the group
+	  <replaceable>firstgroup</replaceable> to 50 GB,
+	  use:</para>
+
+	<screen>&prompt.root; <userinput>zfs set groupquota at firstgroup=50G</userinput></screen>
+
+	<para>To remove the quota for the group
+	  <replaceable>firstgroup</replaceable>, or make sure that one
+	  is not set, instead use:</para>
+
+	<screen>&prompt.root; <userinput>zfs set groupquota at firstgroup=none</userinput></screen>
+
+	<para>As with the user quota property,
+	  non-<username>root</username> users can only see the quotas
+	  associated with the user groups that they belong to, however
+	  a <username>root</username> user or a user with the
+	  <literal>groupquota</literal> privilege can view and set all
+	  quotas for all groups.</para>
+
+	<para>The <command>zfs userspace</command> subcommand displays
+	  the amount of space consumed by each user on the specified
+	  filesystem or snapshot, along with any specified quotas.
+	  The <command>zfs groupspace</command> subcommand does the
+	  same for groups.  For more information about supported
+	  options, or only displaying specific options, see
+	  &man.zfs.1;.</para>
+
+	<para>To list the quota for
+	  <filename>storage/home/bob</filename>, if you have the
+	  correct privileges or are <username>root</username>, use the
+	  following:</para>
 
-		<screen>&prompt.root; <userinput>zfs get quota storage/home/bob</userinput></screen>
+	<screen>&prompt.root; <userinput>zfs get quota storage/home/bob</userinput></screen>
       </sect3>
 
       <sect3>
-		<title>ZFS Reservations</title>
+	<title>ZFS Reservations</title>
+
+	<para>ZFS supports two types of space reservations.
+	  This section will explain the basics of each one,
+	  and include some usage instructions.</para>
+
+	<para>The <literal>reservation</literal> property makes it
+	  possible to reserve a minimum amount of space guaranteed
+	  for a dataset and its descendants.  This means that if a
+	  10 GB reservation is set on
+	  <filename>storage/home/bob</filename>, if disk
+	  space gets low, at least 10 GB of space is reserved
+	  for this dataset.  The <literal>refreservation</literal>
+	  property sets or indicates the minimum amount of space
+	  guaranteed to a dataset excluding descendants, such as
+	  snapshots.  As an example, if a snapshot was taken of
+	  <filename>storage/home/bob</filename>, enough disk space
+	  would have to exist outside of the
+	  <literal>refreservation</literal> amount for the operation
+	  to succeed because descendants of the main data set are
+	  not counted by the <literal>refreservation</literal>
+	  amount and so do not encroach on the space set.</para>
+
+	<para>Reservations of any sort are useful in many
+	  situations, for example planning and testing the
+	  suitability of disk space allocation in a new system, or
+	  ensuring that enough space is available on file systems
+	  for system recovery procedures and files.</para>
+
+	<para>The general format of the <literal>reservation</literal>
+	  property is
+<literal>reservation=<replaceable>size</replaceable></literal>,
+	  so to set a reservation of 10 GB on
+	  <filename>storage/home/bob</filename>the below command is
+	  used:</para>
+
+	<screen>&prompt.root; <userinput>zfs set reservation=10G storage/home/bob</userinput></screen>
 
-		<para>ZFS supports two types of space reservations.  This
-		  section will explain the basics of each one, and include
-		  some usage instructions.</para>
-
-		<para>The <literal>reservation</literal> property makes it
-		  possible to reserve a minimum amount of space guaranteed for a
-		  dataset and its descendants.  This means that if a 10 GB
-		  reservation is set on <filename>storage/home/bob</filename>,
-		  if disk space gets low, at least 10 GB of space is
-		  reserved for this dataset.  The
-		  <literal>refreservation</literal> property sets or indicates
-		  the minimum amount of space guaranteed to a dataset excluding
-		  descendants, such as snapshots.  As an example, if a snapshot
-		  was taken of <filename>storage/home/bob</filename>, enough
-		  disk space would have to exist outside of the
-		  <literal>refreservation</literal> amount for the operation to
-		  succeed because descendants of the main data set are not
-		  counted by the <literal>refreservation</literal> amount and
-		  so do not encroach on the space set.</para>
-
-		<para>Reservations of any sort are useful in many situations,
-		  for example planning and testing the suitability of disk space
-		  allocation in a new system, or ensuring that enough space is
-		  available on file systems for system recovery procedures and
-		  files.</para>
-
-		<para>The general format of the <literal>reservation</literal>
-		  property is
-		  <literal>reservation=<replaceable>size</replaceable></literal>,
-		  so to set a reservation of 10 GB on
-		  <filename>storage/home/bob</filename>the below command is
-		  used:</para>
-
-		<screen>&prompt.root; <userinput>zfs set reservation=10G storage/home/bob</userinput></screen>
-
-		<para>To make sure that no reservation is set, or to remove a
-		  reservation, instead use:</para>
-
-		<screen>&prompt.root; <userinput>zfs set reservation=none storage/home/bob</userinput></screen>
-
-		<para>The same principle can be applied to the
-		  <literal>refreservation</literal> property for setting a
-		  refreservation, with the general format
-		  <literal>refreservation=<replaceable>size</replaceable></literal>.</para>
-
-		<para>To check if any reservations or refreservations exist on
-		  <filename>storage/home/bob</filename>, execute one of the
-		  following commands:</para>
+	<para>To make sure that no reservation is set, or to remove a
+	  reservation, instead use:</para>
 
-		<screen>&prompt.root; <userinput>zfs get reservation storage/home/bob</userinput>
+	<screen>&prompt.root; <userinput>zfs set reservation=none storage/home/bob</userinput></screen>
+
+	<para>The same principle can be applied to the
+	  <literal>refreservation</literal> property for setting a
+	  refreservation, with the general format
+	  <literal>refreservation=<replaceable>size</replaceable></literal>.</para>
+
+	<para>To check if any reservations or refreservations exist on
+	  <filename>storage/home/bob</filename>, execute one of the
+	  following commands:</para>
+
+	<screen>&prompt.root; <userinput>zfs get reservation storage/home/bob</userinput>
 &prompt.root; <userinput>zfs get refreservation storage/home/bob</userinput></screen>
       </sect3>
     </sect2>
@@ -760,12 +779,13 @@ errors: No known data errors</screen>
       <para>The &man.ext2fs.5; file system kernel implementation was
 	written by Godmar Back, and the driver first appeared in
 	&os; 2.2.  In &os; 8 and earlier, the code is licensed under
-	the <acronym>GNU</acronym> Public License, however under &os; 9,
-	the code has been rewritten and it is now licensed under the
-	<acronym>BSD</acronym> license.</para>
+	the <acronym>GNU</acronym> Public License, however under &os;
+	9, the code has been rewritten and it is now licensed under
+	the <acronym>BSD</acronym> license.</para>
 
       <para>The &man.ext2fs.5; driver will allow the &os; kernel
-	to both read and write to <acronym>ext2</acronym> file systems.</para>
+	to both read and write to <acronym>ext2</acronym> file
+	systems.</para>
 
       <para>First, load the kernel loadable module:</para>
 
@@ -776,6 +796,7 @@ errors: No known data errors</screen>
 
       <screen>&prompt.root; <userinput>mount -t ext2fs /dev/ad1s1 /mnt</userinput></screen>
     </sect2>
+
     <sect2>
       <title>XFS</title>
 
@@ -815,6 +836,7 @@ errors: No known data errors</screen>
 	metadata.  This can be used to quickly create a read-only
 	filesystem which can be tested on &os;.</para>
     </sect2>
+
     <sect2>
       <title>ReiserFS</title>
 
@@ -826,7 +848,8 @@ errors: No known data errors</screen>
 	access ReiserFS file systems and read their contents, but not
 	write to them, currently.</para>
 
-      <para>First, the kernel-loadable module needs to be loaded:</para>
+      <para>First, the kernel-loadable module needs to be
+	loaded:</para>
 
       <screen>&prompt.root; <userinput>kldload reiserfs</userinput></screen>
 


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