svn commit: r44779 - head/en_US.ISO8859-1/books/handbook/serialcomms

Dru Lavigne dru at FreeBSD.org
Tue May 6 19:45:13 UTC 2014


Author: dru
Date: Tue May  6 19:45:12 2014
New Revision: 44779
URL: http://svnweb.freebsd.org/changeset/doc/44779

Log:
  Editorial review of intro to Terminals.
  
  Sponsored by:	iXsystems

Modified:
  head/en_US.ISO8859-1/books/handbook/serialcomms/chapter.xml

Modified: head/en_US.ISO8859-1/books/handbook/serialcomms/chapter.xml
==============================================================================
--- head/en_US.ISO8859-1/books/handbook/serialcomms/chapter.xml	Tue May  6 18:41:56 2014	(r44778)
+++ head/en_US.ISO8859-1/books/handbook/serialcomms/chapter.xml	Tue May  6 19:45:12 2014	(r44779)
@@ -619,18 +619,20 @@
   </sect1>
 
   <sect1 xml:id="term">
-    <!--
-    <sect1info>
+    <info>
+    <title>Terminals</title>
+
       <authorgroup>
 	<author>
+	<personname>
 	  <firstname>Sean</firstname>
 	  <surname>Kelly</surname>
-	  <contrib>Contributed by in July 1996</contrib>
+	</personname>
+	  <contrib>Contributed by </contrib>
+    <!--in July 1996 -->
 	</author>
       </authorgroup>
-    </sect1info>
-    -->
-    <title>Terminals</title>
+    </info>
 
     <indexterm><primary>terminals</primary></indexterm>
 
@@ -653,8 +655,8 @@
     <para>Many terminals can be attached to a &os; system.  An older
       spare computer can be used as a terminal wired into a more
       powerful computer running &os;.  This can turn what might
-      otherwise be a single-user computer into a powerful multiple
-      user system.</para>
+      otherwise be a single-user computer into a powerful
+      multiple-user system.</para>
 
     <para>&os; supports three types of terminals:</para>
 
@@ -666,9 +668,8 @@
 	    to computers over serial lines.  They are called
 	    <quote>dumb</quote> because they have only enough
 	    computational power to display, send, and receive text.
-	    No programs can be run on these devices.  Dumb terminals
-	    connect to a computer that has all the power to run text
-	    editors, compilers, email, games, and so forth.</para>
+	    No programs can be run on these devices.  Instead, dumb terminals
+	    connect to a computer that runs the needed programs.</para>
 
 	  <para>There are hundreds of kinds of dumb terminals made
 	    by many manufacturers, and just about any kind will work
@@ -685,11 +686,11 @@
       <varlistentry>
 	<term>Computers Acting as Terminals</term>
 	<listitem>
-	  <para>If a dumb terminal has just enough ability to
+	  <para>Since a dumb terminal has just enough ability to
 	    display, send, and receive text, any spare computer can
 	    be a dumb terminal.  All that is needed is the proper
-	    cable and some <emphasis>terminal
-	    emulation</emphasis> software to run on the
+	    cable and some <firstterm>terminal
+	    emulation</firstterm> software to run on the
 	    computer.</para>
 
 	  <para>This configuration can be useful.  For example, if one
@@ -702,29 +703,24 @@
 	    &os; that can be used to work through a serial connection:
 	    &man.cu.1; and &man.tip.1;.</para>
 
-	  <para>To connect from a client system that runs &os; to the
-	    serial connection of another system, use:</para>
+	  <para>For example, to connect from a client system that runs &os; to the
+	    serial connection of another system:</para>
 
 	  <screen>&prompt.root; <userinput>cu -l <replaceable>serial-port-device</replaceable></userinput></screen>
 
-	  <para>Where <quote>serial-port-device</quote> is the name of
-	    a special device file denoting a serial port on the
-	    system.  These device files are called
-	    <filename>/dev/cuau<replaceable>N</replaceable></filename>.</para>
-
-	  <para>The <quote>N</quote>-part of a device name is the
-	    serial port number.</para>
-
-	  <note>
-	    <para>Note that device numbers in &os; start from zero and
-	      not one.  This means that <filename>COM1</filename>
+	  <para>Replace <replaceable>serial-port-device</replaceable> with the device name of
+	    the connected serial port.  These device files are called
+	    <filename>/dev/cuau<replaceable>N</replaceable></filename>
+	    on &os; versions 8.x and lower and
+	    <filename>/dev/cuad<replaceable>N</replaceable></filename>
+	    on &os; versions 9.x and higher.  In either case,
+	    <replaceable>N</replaceable> is the
+	    serial port number, starting from zero.
+	      This means that <filename>COM1</filename>
 	      is <filename>/dev/cuau0</filename> in &os;.</para>
-	  </note>
 
-	  <note>
-	    <para>Some people prefer to use other programs available
+	    <para>Additional programs are available
 	      through the Ports Collection, such as <package>comms/minicom</package>.</para>
-	  </note>
 	</listitem>
       </varlistentry>
 
@@ -735,9 +731,9 @@
 	    terminal available.  Instead of connecting to a serial
 	    port, they usually connect to a network like Ethernet.
 	    Instead of being relegated to text-only applications, they
-	    can display any X application.</para>
+	    can display any <application>&xorg;</application> application.</para>
 
-	  <para>This chapter does <emphasis>not</emphasis> cover the
+	  <para>This chapter does not cover the
 	    setup, configuration, or use of X terminals.</para>
 	</listitem>
       </varlistentry>


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