svn commit: r44144 - head/en_US.ISO8859-1/books/handbook/advanced-networking

Dru Lavigne dru at FreeBSD.org
Thu Mar 6 02:34:18 UTC 2014


Author: dru
Date: Thu Mar  6 02:34:17 2014
New Revision: 44144
URL: http://svnweb.freebsd.org/changeset/doc/44144

Log:
  White space fix only. Translators can ignore.
  
  Sponsored by: iXsystems

Modified:
  head/en_US.ISO8859-1/books/handbook/advanced-networking/chapter.xml

Modified: head/en_US.ISO8859-1/books/handbook/advanced-networking/chapter.xml
==============================================================================
--- head/en_US.ISO8859-1/books/handbook/advanced-networking/chapter.xml	Thu Mar  6 02:08:27 2014	(r44143)
+++ head/en_US.ISO8859-1/books/handbook/advanced-networking/chapter.xml	Thu Mar  6 02:34:17 2014	(r44144)
@@ -104,20 +104,19 @@
     </indexterm>
 
     <para><firstterm>Routing</firstterm> is the mechanism that allows
-      a system to find the network path to another system.
-      A <firstterm>route</firstterm> is a
-      defined pair of addresses which represent the <quote>destination</quote> and a
+      a system to find the network path to another system.  A
+      <firstterm>route</firstterm> is a defined pair of addresses
+      which represent the <quote>destination</quote> and a
       <quote>gateway</quote>.  The route indicates that when trying
-      to get to the specified destination, send the packets
-      through the specified gateway.  There are three
-      types of destinations: individual hosts, subnets, and
-      <quote>default</quote>.  The <quote>default route</quote> is
-      used if no other routes apply.  There are also three
-      types of gateways: individual hosts, interfaces, also called
-      links, and Ethernet hardware
+      to get to the specified destination, send the packets through
+      the specified gateway.  There are three types of destinations:
+      individual hosts, subnets, and <quote>default</quote>.  The
+      <quote>default route</quote> is used if no other routes apply.
+      There are also three types of gateways: individual hosts,
+      interfaces, also called links, and Ethernet hardware
       (<acronym>MAC</acronym>) addresses.  Known routes are stored in
       a routing table.</para>
-      
+
     <para>This section provides an overview of routing basics.  It
       then demonstrates how to configure a &os; system as a router and
       offers some troubleshooting tips.</para>
@@ -125,7 +124,8 @@
     <sect2 xml:id="network-routing-default">
       <title>Routing Basics</title>
 
-      <para>To view the routing table of a &os; system, use &man.netstat.1;:</para>
+      <para>To view the routing table of a &os; system, use
+	&man.netstat.1;:</para>
 
       <screen>&prompt.user; <userinput>netstat -r</userinput>
 Routing tables
@@ -148,111 +148,120 @@ host2.example.com link#1            UC  
 	<varlistentry>
 	  <term>default</term>
 	  <listitem>
-      <para>The first route in this table specifies the <literal>default</literal>
-	route.  When the local system needs to make a connection to a
-	remote host, it checks the routing table to determine if a
-	known path exists.  If the remote host matches an entry in the
-	table, the system checks to see if it
-	can connect using the interface specified in that entry.</para>
-
-      <para>If the destination does not match an entry, or if all known
-	paths fail, the system uses the entry for the
-	default route.  For hosts on a local area network, the
-	<literal>Gateway</literal> field in the default route is set
-	to the system which has a direct connection to
-	the Internet.  When reading this entry, verify that the
-	<literal>Flags</literal> column indicates that the gateway is
-	usable (<literal>UG</literal>).</para>
-
-      <para>The default route for a machine which itself is
-	functioning as the gateway to the outside world will be the
-	gateway machine at the Internet Service Provider
-	(<acronym>ISP</acronym>).</para>
-      </listitem>
-    </varlistentry>
-
-      <varlistentry>
-	<term>localhost</term>
-	<listitem>
-      <para>The second route is the <literal>localhost</literal> route.
-	The interface specified in the <literal>Netif</literal> column
-	for <literal>localhost</literal> is <filename>lo0</filename>,
-	also known as the loopback device.  This indicates that all
-	traffic for this destination should be internal, rather than sending it
-	out over the network.</para>
-      </listitem>
-    </varlistentry>
+	    <para>The first route in this table specifies the
+	      <literal>default</literal> route.  When the local system
+	      needs to make a connection to a remote host, it checks
+	      the routing table to determine if a known path exists.
+	      If the remote host matches an entry in the table, the
+	      system checks to see if it can connect using the
+	      interface specified in that entry.</para>
+
+	    <para>If the destination does not match an entry, or if
+	      all known paths fail, the system uses the entry for the
+	      default route.  For hosts on a local area network, the
+	      <literal>Gateway</literal> field in the default route is
+	      set to the system which has a direct connection to the
+	      Internet.  When reading this entry, verify that the
+	      <literal>Flags</literal> column indicates that the
+	      gateway is usable (<literal>UG</literal>).</para>
+
+	    <para>The default route for a machine which itself is
+	      functioning as the gateway to the outside world will be
+	      the gateway machine at the Internet Service Provider
+	      (<acronym>ISP</acronym>).</para>
+	  </listitem>
+	</varlistentry>
 
-      <varlistentry>
-	<term>MAC address</term>
-	<listitem>
-      <para>The addresses beginning with <systemitem
-	  class="etheraddress">0:e0:</systemitem> are <acronym>MAC</acronym>
-	addresses.  &os; will automatically identify any hosts,
-	<systemitem>test0</systemitem> in the example, on the local
-	Ethernet and add a route for that host over the Ethernet
-	interface, <filename>re0</filename>.  This type of route has a
-	timeout, seen in the <literal>Expire</literal> column, which
-	is used if the host does not respond in a specific amount of
-	time.  When this happens, the route to this host will be
-	automatically deleted.  These hosts are identified using the
-	Routing Information Protocol (<acronym>RIP</acronym>), which
-	calculates routes to local hosts based upon a shortest path
-	determination.</para>
-      </listitem>
-    </varlistentry>
+	<varlistentry>
+	  <term>localhost</term>
+	  <listitem>
+	    <para>The second route is the <literal>localhost</literal>
+	      route.  The interface specified in the
+	      <literal>Netif</literal> column for
+	      <literal>localhost</literal> is
+	      <filename>lo0</filename>, also known as the loopback
+	      device.  This indicates that all traffic for this
+	      destination should be internal, rather than sending it
+	      out over the network.</para>
+	  </listitem>
+	</varlistentry>
 
-      <varlistentry>
-	<term>subnet</term>
-	<listitem>
-      <para>&os; will automatically add subnet routes for the local subnet.
-	In this example, <systemitem class="ipaddress">10.20.30.255</systemitem> is the
-	broadcast address for the subnet <systemitem
-	  class="ipaddress">10.20.30</systemitem> and <systemitem
-	  class="fqdomainname">example.com</systemitem> is the domain
-	name associated with that subnet.  The designation
-	<literal>link#1</literal> refers to the first Ethernet card in
-	the machine.</para>
-
-      <para>Local network hosts and local subnets have their routes
-	automatically configured by a daemon called &man.routed.8;.
-	If it is not running, only routes which are statically defined
-	by the administrator will exist.</para>
-      </listitem>
-    </varlistentry>
+	<varlistentry>
+	  <term>MAC address</term>
+	  <listitem>
+	    <para>The addresses beginning with <systemitem
+		class="etheraddress">0:e0:</systemitem> are
+	      <acronym>MAC</acronym> addresses.  &os; will
+	      automatically identify any hosts,
+	      <systemitem>test0</systemitem> in the example, on the
+	      local Ethernet and add a route for that host over the
+	      Ethernet interface, <filename>re0</filename>.  This type
+	      of route has a timeout, seen in the
+	      <literal>Expire</literal> column, which is used if the
+	      host does not respond in a specific amount of time.
+	      When this happens, the route to this host will be
+	      automatically deleted.  These hosts are identified using
+	      the Routing Information Protocol
+	      (<acronym>RIP</acronym>), which calculates routes to
+	      local hosts based upon a shortest path
+	      determination.</para>
+	  </listitem>
+	</varlistentry>
 
-      <varlistentry>
-	<term>host</term>
-	<listitem>
-      <para>The <literal>host1</literal> line refers to the host
-	by its Ethernet address.  Since it is the sending host, &os;
-	knows to use the loopback interface
-	(<filename>lo0</filename>) rather than the Ethernet
-	interface.</para>
+	<varlistentry>
+	  <term>subnet</term>
+	  <listitem>
+	    <para>&os; will automatically add subnet routes for the
+	      local subnet.  In this example, <systemitem
+		class="ipaddress">10.20.30.255</systemitem> is the
+	      broadcast address for the subnet <systemitem
+		class="ipaddress">10.20.30</systemitem> and
+	      <systemitem
+		class="fqdomainname">example.com</systemitem> is the
+	      domain name associated with that subnet.  The
+	      designation <literal>link#1</literal> refers to the
+	      first Ethernet card in the machine.</para>
+
+	    <para>Local network hosts and local subnets have their
+	      routes automatically configured by a daemon called
+	      &man.routed.8;.  If it is not running, only routes which
+	      are statically defined by the administrator will
+	      exist.</para>
+	  </listitem>
+	</varlistentry>
 
-      <para>The two <literal>host2</literal> lines represent aliases
-	which were created using &man.ifconfig.8;.  The
-	<literal>=></literal> symbol after the
-	<filename>lo0</filename> interface says that an alias has been
-	set in addition to the loopback address.  Such routes only
-	show up on the host that supports the alias and all other hosts
-	on the local network will have a
-	<literal>link#1</literal> line for such routes.</para>
-      </listitem>
-    </varlistentry>
+	<varlistentry>
+	  <term>host</term>
+	  <listitem>
+	    <para>The <literal>host1</literal> line refers to the host
+	      by its Ethernet address.  Since it is the sending host,
+	      &os; knows to use the loopback interface
+	      (<filename>lo0</filename>) rather than the Ethernet
+	      interface.</para>
+
+	    <para>The two <literal>host2</literal> lines represent
+	      aliases which were created using &man.ifconfig.8;.  The
+	      <literal>=></literal> symbol after the
+	      <filename>lo0</filename> interface says that an alias
+	      has been set in addition to the loopback address.  Such
+	      routes only show up on the host that supports the alias
+	      and all other hosts on the local network will have a
+	      <literal>link#1</literal> line for such routes.</para>
+	  </listitem>
+	</varlistentry>
 
-      <varlistentry>
-	<term>224</term>
-	<listitem>
-      <para>The final line (destination subnet <systemitem
-	  class="ipaddress">224</systemitem>) deals with
-	multicasting.</para>
-      </listitem>
-    </varlistentry>
-  </variablelist>
+	<varlistentry>
+	  <term>224</term>
+	  <listitem>
+	    <para>The final line (destination subnet <systemitem
+		class="ipaddress">224</systemitem>) deals with
+	      multicasting.</para>
+	  </listitem>
+	</varlistentry>
+      </variablelist>
 
-      <para>Various attributes of each route can be seen in
-	the <literal>Flags</literal> column.  <xref linkend="routeflags"/>
+      <para>Various attributes of each route can be seen in the
+	<literal>Flags</literal> column.  <xref linkend="routeflags"/>
 	summarizes some of these flags and their meanings:</para>
 
       <table xml:id="routeflags" frame="none" pgwide="1">
@@ -274,15 +283,14 @@ host2.example.com link#1            UC  
 
 	    <row>
 	      <entry>H</entry>
-	      <entry>The route destination is a single
-		host.</entry>
+	      <entry>The route destination is a single host.</entry>
 	    </row>
 
 	    <row>
 	      <entry>G</entry>
-	      <entry>Send anything for this destination on to
-		this gateway, which will figure out from there
-		where to send it.</entry>
+	      <entry>Send anything for this destination on to this
+		gateway, which will figure out from there where to
+		send it.</entry>
 	    </row>
 
 	    <row>
@@ -292,16 +300,15 @@ host2.example.com link#1            UC  
 
 	    <row>
 	      <entry>C</entry>
-	      <entry>Clones a new route based upon this
-		route for machines to connect to.  This type of route
-		is normally used for local networks.</entry>
+	      <entry>Clones a new route based upon this route for
+		machines to connect to.  This type of route is
+		normally used for local networks.</entry>
 	    </row>
 
 	    <row>
 	      <entry>W</entry>
-	      <entry>The route was
-		auto-configured based upon a local area network
-		(clone) route.</entry>
+	      <entry>The route was auto-configured based upon a local
+		area network (clone) route.</entry>
 	    </row>
 
 	    <row>
@@ -326,7 +333,7 @@ host2.example.com link#1            UC  
 
       <para>Note that manually added routes will not survive a reboot.
 	For more information on manual manipulation of network
-	routing tables, refer to &man.route.8;.</para>     
+	routing tables, refer to &man.route.8;.</para>
     </sect2>
 
     <sect2 xml:id="network-static-routes">
@@ -352,20 +359,20 @@ host2.example.com link#1            UC  
       <para>A &os; system can be configured as the default gateway, or
 	router, for a network if it is a dual-homed system.  A
 	dual-homed system is a host which resides on at least two
-	different networks.  Typically, each network is connected to a separate
-	network interface, though <acronym>IP</acronym> aliasing can
-	be used to bind multiple addresses, each on a different
-	subnet, to one physical interface.</para>
+	different networks.  Typically, each network is connected to a
+	separate network interface, though <acronym>IP</acronym>
+	aliasing can be used to bind multiple addresses, each on a
+	different subnet, to one physical interface.</para>
 
       <indexterm>
 	<primary>router</primary>
       </indexterm>
 
       <para>In order for the system to forward packets between
-	interfaces, &os; must be configured as a router.  Internet standards and good
-	engineering practice prevent the &os; Project from enabling
-	this feature by default, but it can be configured to start at boot
-	by adding this line to
+	interfaces, &os; must be configured as a router.  Internet
+	standards and good engineering practice prevent the &os;
+	Project from enabling this feature by default, but it can be
+	configured to start at boot by adding this line to
 	<filename>/etc/rc.conf</filename>:</para>
 
       <programlisting>gateway_enable="YES"          # Set to YES if this host will be a gateway</programlisting>
@@ -387,31 +394,30 @@ host2.example.com link#1            UC  
 
       <para>The routing table of a router needs additional routes so
 	it knows how to reach other networks.  Routes can be either
-	added manually using
-	static routes or routes can be automatically learned using a routing protocol.
-	Static routes are appropriate for small networks and this
-	section describes how to add a static routing entry for a
-	small network.</para>
+	added manually using static routes or routes can be
+	automatically learned using a routing protocol.  Static routes
+	are appropriate for small networks and this section describes
+	how to add a static routing entry for a small network.</para>
 
-	<note>
+      <note>
 	<para>For large networks, static routes quickly become
-	  unscalable.  &os; comes with the standard <acronym>BSD</acronym> routing daemon
-	&man.routed.8;, which provides the routing protocols <acronym>RIP</acronym>, versions
-	1 and 2, and <acronym>IRDP</acronym>.  Support for the
-	<acronym>BGP</acronym> and <acronym>OSPF</acronym>
-	routing protocols can be installed using the
-	<package>net/zebra</package> package or
-	port.</para>
+	  unscalable.  &os; comes with the standard
+	  <acronym>BSD</acronym> routing daemon &man.routed.8;, which
+	  provides the routing protocols <acronym>RIP</acronym>,
+	  versions 1 and 2, and <acronym>IRDP</acronym>.  Support for
+	  the <acronym>BGP</acronym> and <acronym>OSPF</acronym>
+	  routing protocols can be installed using the
+	  <package>net/zebra</package> package or port.</para>
       </note>
 
-	<para>Consider the following network:</para>
+      <para>Consider the following network:</para>
 
-	<mediaobject>
-	  <imageobject>
-	    <imagedata fileref="advanced-networking/static-routes"/>
-	  </imageobject>
+      <mediaobject>
+	<imageobject>
+	  <imagedata fileref="advanced-networking/static-routes"/>
+	</imageobject>
 
-	  <textobject>
+	<textobject>
 	<literallayout class="monospaced">
     INTERNET
       | (10.0.0.1/24) Default Router to Internet
@@ -435,23 +441,22 @@ host2.example.com link#1            UC  
                        | 192.168.2.1/24
                        |
                      Internal Net 2</literallayout>
-	  </textobject>
-	</mediaobject>
+	</textobject>
+      </mediaobject>
 
-	<para>In this scenario, <systemitem>RouterA</systemitem> is a
-	  &os; machine that is acting as a router to the rest of the
-	  Internet.  It has a default route set to <systemitem
-	    class="ipaddress">10.0.0.1</systemitem> which allows it to
-	  connect with the outside world.
-	  <systemitem>RouterB</systemitem> is already configured
-	  to use <systemitem
-	    class="ipaddress">192.168.1.1</systemitem> as its default
-	  gateway.</para>
+      <para>In this scenario, <systemitem>RouterA</systemitem> is a
+	&os; machine that is acting as a router to the rest of the
+	Internet.  It has a default route set to <systemitem
+	  class="ipaddress">10.0.0.1</systemitem> which allows it to
+	connect with the outside world.
+	<systemitem>RouterB</systemitem> is already configured to use
+	<systemitem class="ipaddress">192.168.1.1</systemitem> as its
+	default gateway.</para>
 
-	<para>Before adding any static routes, the routing table on <systemitem>RouterA</systemitem>
-	  looks like this:</para>
+      <para>Before adding any static routes, the routing table on
+	<systemitem>RouterA</systemitem> looks like this:</para>
 
-	<screen>&prompt.user; <userinput>netstat -nr</userinput>
+      <screen>&prompt.user; <userinput>netstat -nr</userinput>
 Routing tables
 
 Internet:
@@ -461,56 +466,55 @@ default            10.0.0.1           UG
 10.0.0.0/24        link#1             UC          0        0    xl0
 192.168.1.0/24     link#2             UC          0        0    xl1</screen>
 
-	<para>With the current routing table,
-	  <systemitem>RouterA</systemitem>
-	  does not have a route to the <systemitem
-	    class="ipaddress">192.168.2.0/24</systemitem> network.  The
-	  following command adds the <literal>Internal Net 2</literal> network to
-	  <systemitem>RouterA</systemitem>'s routing table using
-	  <systemitem class="ipaddress">192.168.1.2</systemitem> as
-	  the next hop:</para>
-
-	<screen>&prompt.root; <userinput>route add -net 192.168.2.0/24 192.168.1.2</userinput></screen>
-
-	<para>Now, <systemitem>RouterA</systemitem> can reach any host
-	  on the <systemitem
-	    class="ipaddress">192.168.2.0/24</systemitem>
-	  network.  However, the routing information will not
-	  persist if the &os; system reboots.  If a static route needs
-	  to be persistent, add it to
-	  <filename>/etc/rc.conf</filename>:</para>
+      <para>With the current routing table,
+	<systemitem>RouterA</systemitem> does not have a route to the
+	<systemitem class="ipaddress">192.168.2.0/24</systemitem>
+	network.  The following command adds the <literal>Internal Net
+	  2</literal> network to <systemitem>RouterA</systemitem>'s
+	routing table using <systemitem
+	  class="ipaddress">192.168.1.2</systemitem> as the next
+	hop:</para>
+
+      <screen>&prompt.root; <userinput>route add -net 192.168.2.0/24 192.168.1.2</userinput></screen>
+
+      <para>Now, <systemitem>RouterA</systemitem> can reach any host
+	on the <systemitem
+	  class="ipaddress">192.168.2.0/24</systemitem> network.
+	However, the routing information will not persist if the &os;
+	system reboots.  If a static route needs to be persistent, add
+	it to <filename>/etc/rc.conf</filename>:</para>
 
-	<programlisting># Add Internal Net 2 as a persistent static route
+      <programlisting># Add Internal Net 2 as a persistent static route
 static_routes="internalnet2"
 route_internalnet2="-net 192.168.2.0/24 192.168.1.2"</programlisting>
 
-	<para>The <literal>static_routes</literal> configuration
-	  variable is a list of strings separated by a space, where
-	  each string references a route name.  The variable
-	  <literal>route_internalnet2</literal>
-	  contains the static route for that route name.</para>
-
-	<para>Using more than one string in
-	  <literal>static_routes</literal> creates multiple static
-	  routes.  The following shows an example of adding static
-	  routes for the <systemitem
-	    class="ipaddress">192.168.0.0/24</systemitem> and
-	  <systemitem class="ipaddress">192.168.1.0/24</systemitem>
-	  networks:</para>
+      <para>The <literal>static_routes</literal> configuration
+	variable is a list of strings separated by a space, where
+	each string references a route name.  The variable
+	<literal>route_internalnet2</literal> contains the static
+	route for that route name.</para>
+
+      <para>Using more than one string in
+	<literal>static_routes</literal> creates multiple static
+	routes.  The following shows an example of adding static
+	routes for the <systemitem
+	  class="ipaddress">192.168.0.0/24</systemitem> and
+	<systemitem class="ipaddress">192.168.1.0/24</systemitem>
+	networks:</para>
 
-	<programlisting>static_routes="net1 net2"
+      <programlisting>static_routes="net1 net2"
 route_net1="-net 192.168.0.0/24 192.168.0.1"
 route_net2="-net 192.168.1.0/24 192.168.1.1"</programlisting>
     </sect2>
 
-   <sect2 xml:id="network-routing-troubleshooting">
+    <sect2 xml:id="network-routing-troubleshooting">
       <title>Troubleshooting</title>
 
       <para>When an address space is assigned to a network, the
 	service provider configures their routing tables so that all
-	traffic for the network will be sent to the link for the
-	site.  But how do external sites know to send their packets
-	to the network's <acronym>ISP</acronym>?</para>
+	traffic for the network will be sent to the link for the site.
+	But how do external sites know to send their packets to the
+	network's <acronym>ISP</acronym>?</para>
 
       <para>There is a system that keeps track of all assigned
 	address spaces and defines their point of connection to the
@@ -530,17 +534,18 @@ route_net2="-net 192.168.1.0/24 192.168.
 	<primary>&man.traceroute.8;</primary>
       </indexterm>
 
-      <para>Sometimes, there is a problem with route propagation
-	and some sites are unable to connect.  Perhaps the most
-	useful command for trying to figure out where routing is
-	breaking down is <command>traceroute</command>.  It is useful when
+      <para>Sometimes, there is a problem with route propagation and
+	some sites are unable to connect.  Perhaps the most useful
+	command for trying to figure out where routing is breaking
+	down is <command>traceroute</command>.  It is useful when
 	<command>ping</command> fails.</para>
 
-      <para>When using <command>traceroute</command>, include the address of the
-	remote host to connect to.  The output will show the gateway
-	hosts along the path of the attempt, eventually either
-	reaching the target host, or terminating because of a lack of
-	connection.  For more information, refer to &man.traceroute.8;.</para>
+      <para>When using <command>traceroute</command>, include the
+	address of the remote host to connect to.  The output will
+	show the gateway hosts along the path of the attempt,
+	eventually either reaching the target host, or terminating
+	because of a lack of connection.  For more information, refer
+	to &man.traceroute.8;.</para>
     </sect2>
 
     <sect2 xml:id="network-routing-multicast">
@@ -556,29 +561,29 @@ route_net2="-net 192.168.1.0/24 192.168.
 
       <para>&os; natively supports both multicast applications and
 	multicast routing.  Multicast applications do not require any
-	special configuration in order to
-	run on &os;.  Support for multicast routing requires that the
-	following option
-	be compiled into a custom kernel:</para>
+	special configuration in order to run on &os;.  Support for
+	multicast routing requires that the following option be
+	compiled into a custom kernel:</para>
 
       <programlisting>options MROUTING</programlisting>
 
       <para>The multicast routing daemon,
-	<application>mrouted</application> can be installed
-	using the <package>net/mrouted</package> package or port.
-	This daemon implements
-	the <acronym>DVMRP</acronym> multicast routing protocol and is
-	configured by editing <filename>/usr/local/etc/mrouted.conf</filename>
-	in order to set up the tunnels and <acronym>DVMRP</acronym>.
-	The installation of <application>mrouted</application> also installs
-	<application>map-mbone</application> and
+	<application>mrouted</application> can be installed using the
+	<package>net/mrouted</package> package or port.  This daemon
+	implements the <acronym>DVMRP</acronym> multicast routing
+	protocol and is configured by editing
+	<filename>/usr/local/etc/mrouted.conf</filename> in order to
+	set up the tunnels and <acronym>DVMRP</acronym>.  The
+	installation of <application>mrouted</application> also
+	installs <application>map-mbone</application> and
 	<application>mrinfo</application>, as well as their associated
 	man pages.  Refer to these for configuration examples.</para>
 
       <note>
-	<para><acronym>DVMRP</acronym> has largely been replaced by the
-	  <acronym>PIM</acronym> protocol in many
-	  multicast installations.  Refer to &man.pim.4; for more information.</para>
+	<para><acronym>DVMRP</acronym> has largely been replaced by
+	  the <acronym>PIM</acronym> protocol in many multicast
+	  installations.  Refer to &man.pim.4; for more
+	  information.</para>
       </note>
     </sect2>
   </sect1>


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