svn commit: r42218 - head/en_US.ISO8859-1/htdocs/news/status

Gabor Pali pgj at FreeBSD.org
Tue Jul 9 13:22:59 UTC 2013


Author: pgj
Date: Tue Jul  9 13:22:59 2013
New Revision: 42218
URL: http://svnweb.freebsd.org/changeset/doc/42218

Log:
  - Many minor fixes from Warren -- thanks!
  
  Submitted by:	wblock

Modified:
  head/en_US.ISO8859-1/htdocs/news/status/report-2013-04-2013-06.xml

Modified: head/en_US.ISO8859-1/htdocs/news/status/report-2013-04-2013-06.xml
==============================================================================
--- head/en_US.ISO8859-1/htdocs/news/status/report-2013-04-2013-06.xml	Tue Jul  9 09:10:23 2013	(r42217)
+++ head/en_US.ISO8859-1/htdocs/news/status/report-2013-04-2013-06.xml	Tue Jul  9 13:22:59 2013	(r42218)
@@ -1238,7 +1238,7 @@
 
       <task>Look into replacements for HAL.  HAL is used for
 	hot-plugging of devices, but it has been long abandoned by
-	Linux.  A replacement, perhaps build on top of <tt>devd(8)</tt>,
+	Linux.  A replacement, perhaps built on top of <tt>devd(8)</tt>,
 	would be nice to have.  This work should be coordinated with the
 	&os; GNOME and KDE teams.</task>
     </help>
@@ -1272,26 +1272,26 @@
     </links>
 
     <body>
-      <p>We are proud to announce &os; Haskell Team has updated the
-	Haskell Platform to 2013.2.0.0, GHC to 7.6.3, as well as updated
-	existing ports to their latest stable versions.  In this update,
-	we provided experimental support for LLVM-based code generation
-	(disabled by default) to Haskell ports.  We also added number of
-	new ports, which brings their count in &os; Ports Collection to
-	402, and now Haskell ports play nicer with
-	<tt>portmaster(8)</tt>-based upgrades.</p>
+      <p>We are proud to announce that the &os; Haskell Team has updated
+	the Haskell Platform to 2013.2.0.0, GHC to 7.6.3, as well as
+	updated existing ports to their latest stable versions.  In this
+	update, we provided experimental support for LLVM-based code
+	generation (disabled by default) to Haskell ports.  We also
+	added a number of new ports, which brings their count in the
+	&os; Ports Collection to 402, and now Haskell ports play nicer
+	with <tt>portmaster(8)</tt>-based upgrades.</p>
 
       <p>In cooperation with Konstantin Belousov and Dimitry Andric, we
-	have managed to unbreak build of GHC on 32-bit 10.x systems, so
-	we have packages for 10.x again.  However, it turned out that
+	have managed to unbreak the build of GHC on 32-bit 10.x systems,
+	so we have packages for 10.x again.  However, it turned out that
 	this bug (in thread signal delivery) can also affect the
 	building process for other platforms as well, which explains
 	some of the strange build breakages our users experienced in the
 	past.</p>
 
-      <p>We have also learned that there is an <a
+      <p>We have also learned that there is <a
 	  href="http://www.haskell.org/pipermail/ghc-devs/2013-June/001506.html">ongoing work</a>
-	in GHC upstream which will allow us to provide support for
+	in the GHC upstream which will allow us to provide support for
 	building with Clang natively once GHC 7.8 becomes part of
 	the Haskell Platform.</p>
     </body>
@@ -1350,8 +1350,8 @@
     </links>
 
     <body>
-      <p>There have been new utilities introduced in &os; base system:
-	<tt>bsdconfig(8)</tt> and <tt>sysrc(8)</tt>.  The
+      <p>New utilities have been introduced in &os; base system:
+	<tt>bsdconfig(8)</tt> and <tt>sysrc(8)</tt>.
 	<tt>bsdconfig(8)</tt> is a replacement for the post-install
 	abilities of deprecated <tt>sysinstall(8)</tt>, while
 	<tt>sysrc(8)</tt> is a robust utility for managing
@@ -1568,7 +1568,7 @@ functionality through <tt>pkg(8)</tt>.</
 	also a plan to implement two new modules for Casper.  Casper is
 	a daemon to provide services for applications using Capsicum's
 	capability mode.  Some experimentation with implementing two new
-	capability rights is in progress, so as porting one more program
+	capability rights is in progress, so is porting one more program
 	to use the existing features of the Capsicum framework.</p>
     </body>
 
@@ -1577,7 +1577,7 @@ functionality through <tt>pkg(8)</tt>.</
 	connect and listen on Unix domain socket.</task>
 
       <task><tt>system.udp</tt> — a Casper module enabling
-	connect, listen, sending and receive UDP packages.</task>
+	connect, listen, send, and receive of UDP packets.</task>
 
       <task>Implementing sandboxing for <tt>fetch(1)</tt>.</task>
 
@@ -1622,13 +1622,13 @@ functionality through <tt>pkg(8)</tt>.</
       </ol>
 
       <p>The common parameters used on TCP sessions have changed quite a
-	bit since SYN cookies very invented some 17 years ago.  Today we
-	have a lot more bandwidth which makes the use window scaling
+	bit since SYN cookies were invented some 17 years ago.  Today we
+	have a lot more bandwidth which makes use of window scaling
 	almost mandatory.  Also SACK has become standard as it makes
 	recovering from packet loss much more efficient.</p>
 
       <p>The original SYN cookies method only stored an indexed MSS
-	values in the cookie.  This obviously is not sufficient anymore
+	value in the cookie.  This obviously is not sufficient any more
 	and breaks in the presence of WSCALE.  WSCALE information is
 	only exchanged during SYN and SYN-ACK.  If we cannot keep track
 	of it then we severely underestimate the available send or
@@ -1636,28 +1636,28 @@ functionality through <tt>pkg(8)</tt>.</
 	scaling the window size information on the TCP segment header
 	would be even lower numerically.</p>
 
-      <p>A number of years back SYN cookies have been extended to store
-	the additional state in the TCP timestamp fields, if available
-	on a connection.  It has been adopted by Linux as well.  While
+      <p>A number of years back, SYN cookies were extended to store the
+	additional state in the TCP timestamp fields, if available on a
+	connection.  It has been adopted by Linux as well.  While
 	timestamps are common among the BSD, Linux and other Unix
 	systems, Windows never enabled them by default, thus they are
 	not present for the vast majority of clients seen on the
 	Internet.</p>
 
       <p>The new improvement in this patch moves all necessary
-	information into the ISN again removing the need for timestamps.
-	Both the MSS and send WSCALE are stored in 3 bit indexed form
-	together with a single bit for SACK.  While we cannot represent
-	all possible MSS and WSCALE values, both are 16 bit fields in
-	the TCP header, in only 3 bits each this, it turns out, is not
-	actually necessary.</p>
+	information into the ISN again, removing the need for
+	timestamps.  Both the MSS and send WSCALE are stored in 3 bit
+	indexed form together with a single bit for SACK.  While we
+	cannot represent all possible MSS and WSCALE values in only 3
+	bits each (both are 16-bit fields in the TCP header), it turns
+	out that is not actually necessary.</p>
 
       <p>These improvements allow one to run with SYN cookies only on
 	Internet-facing servers.  However while SYN cookies are
 	calculated and sent all the time, they are only used when the
-	syn cache overflows due to attacks or overload.  In that cause
+	syn cache overflows due to attacks or overload.  In that case
 	though, you can rest assured that no significant degradation in
-	TCP connection setup happens anymore and that even Windows
+	TCP connection setup happens any more and that even Windows
 	clients can make use of window scaling and SACK.</p>
     </body>
 


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