Multi-Homed Routing

Haesu haesu at towardex.com
Tue Sep 2 07:34:21 PDT 2003


Policy Proposal 2003-11 at ARIN may end up reducing from /20 to /22 for multihomed organizations.

But regardless, getting a /24 is not hard. Ask your upstream. Your upstream provider assigns you a /24, not your regional RIR.
Your RIR will only assign you on bigger needs, i.e. /20 as you said.

Get on route-views.oregon-ix.net and see to yourself how many /24's are existing on internet routing table, not to mention how many of them are from North America, especially USA.

-hc

-- 
Sincerely,
  Haesu C.
  TowardEX Technologies, Inc.
  WWW: http://www.towardex.com
  E-mail: haesu at towardex.com
  Cell: (978) 394-2867

On Mon, Sep 01, 2003 at 09:53:54PM -0700, Tom wrote:
> 
> On Mon, 1 Sep 2003, Doug Barton wrote:
> 
> > On Mon, 1 Sep 2003, Tom wrote:
> >
> > > For those in the Americas, ARIN will not give you anything less than a
> > > /19
> >
> > If this was ever true, it hasn't been true for a long time:
> >
> > http://www.arin.net/policy/ipv4.html
> 
>   Strictly speaking it is a /20 now.  It was changed.  But to get a /20,
> you need to prove that you are actually using a /20's worth of space of
> already.  That means completing filling at least 12 class-Cs.  And by
> getting a block from ARIN, you are compelled to re-number, meaning most of
> your /20 is gone.  That is ok, if your network isn't growing too quickly,
> but if you are adding lots yet, most networks will want a /19.
> 
>   You certainly are not going to get a /24 from ARIN:
> 
> ARIN allocates IP address prefixes no longer than /20. If allocations
> smaller than /20 are needed, ISPs should request address space from their
> upstream provider.
> 
> 
> > Doug
> >
> > --
> 
> 
> Tom



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