BSDstats Statistics for Sept, 2007 ... 12 769 Hosts Reported In

Marc G. Fournier scrappy at freebsd.org
Mon Oct 15 20:29:06 PDT 2007


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- --On Friday, October 05, 2007 13:05:56 +0100 Miguel Lopes Santos Ramos 
<miguel at anjos.strangled.net> wrote:

>> From: "Marc G. Fournier" <scrappy at freebsd.org>
> [...]
>> Percentage Change in September from August:
>>
>>            Overall           +12.8%
> [...]
>>            FreeBSD           - 7.4%  (5008 hosts)
>
> Numbers have gone down as to what FreeBSD is concerned.

Actually, so far this month, they've gone up 0.3% (and its only middle of 
month) ... it does fluctuate from month to month ...

> I think it's because the bsdstats script is becoming a bit of a pain...
> - The script keeps being changed and updated...

Pardon?  I have very rarely changed it ... I committed a change on Aug 29th to 
fix a problem with install.sh generating an error, and the last commit before 
that was on April 30th to clean up a bunch of portlint warnings ... prior to 
that, it was modified Dec 9th ... so there is about 4 months between updates 
...

> - The script now wants to run on startup, which is a pain. Why? What was wrong
> with monthly reports? Why the haste? In my case it runs before an HTTP proxy
> is up and running... I had to disable it. Why on earth enabled by default?
> That's not what most ports do... The FreeBSD user is usually expected to
> manually enable the port after installing it.

 ... we had several ppl reporting issues where they were using it on desktop's 
where the desktop was shut down over night, and would therefore *never* get 
reported ...  if you are running a server, by all means, disable it in 
/etc/rc.conf ...

Oddly enough, when I did add the /etc/rc.conf option, it was asking if you 
wanted to enable it there or not ... now that you point it out, am looking into 
it, since it was meant to be optional ... in fact, will add a note to the 
question that states that enabling in /etc/rc.conf is meant for desktop/laptops 
that aren't necessarily 'always on', not for servers that are ... thanks for 
pointing this one out, I didn't realize ...

> While a lot of us understands the interest of this, and even takes the time to
> take a look at how it's done, we also don't have the time to keep peting it
> every time it changes behaviour. The first reaction might be uninstall the
> port.

Changing behaviour?  Other then cleaning up some port code itself, and adding 
the /etc/rc.conf (which only affects things the first time installed), there 
has been no change in behaviour since ... December, from what I can tell, and 
the only change of behaviour then was to actually report non-configured devices 
that pciconf files ... so not 100% certain what you are talking about 
concerning 'changing behavioiur' ...

> Also, I think the enabled by default thing is a very bad idea. Consider when
> you're deploying a BSD in an enterprise environment; not everybody might
> understand imediatly that it would be beneficial to have that thing reporting
> automatically and by default...

I don't believe anyone has advocated for 'enabled by default' in FreeBSD ... 
one of these days it would be nice if it was an install option in sysinstall, 
but that would again be purely opt-in, not on by default ...

- ----
Marc G. Fournier           Hub.Org Networking Services (http://www.hub.org)
Email . scrappy at hub.org                              MSN . scrappy at hub.org
Yahoo . yscrappy               Skype: hub.org        ICQ . 7615664
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